completed garment for yarn along.

yarn along

Joining the generous Ginny this week who is kind enough to host yarn along from her website Small Things ,I get to show off my completed Boston Chevron Infinity Cowl .       At last I have mastered the chevron stitch.  Drum roll! I don’t know why but for some reason I just couldn’t get my hook or brain around the chevron stitch. This pattern I purchased from Ravelry was very straightforward and the chevron stitch and I are now firm friends. Perhaps I have worked with wool for too long but when I looked at the photograph of the cowl my immediate thought was” that is exactly what an enormous knitted wooly mammoth’s poo would like!”

baby wooly mammothThe book I am reading is from the wonderful Northcote Library and it  is called Herbs for Australian Gardens. The author is  Penny Woodward.  I love the idea of fresh herbs and who knows, this could be the beginning of something good. Any advice for a novice herb grower who really should stop procrastinating and get back to  consignments and pattern making?

Author: gentlestitches

the future is in our hands.

19 thoughts on “completed garment for yarn along.”

  1. Thank you, it looks much better on a person than on a table:) (thank goodness) You are right about herbs and veggies being wonderful when they are fresh. Ah time…… 🙂

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  2. Oh Sharon this is really gorgeous!! Beautiful colors! Your title for this is so funny!! And I also would love to try herb gardening – I just need to find time; but I agree, there’s nothing like fresh herbs on veggies or dinner foods.

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  3. I’ve been studying your cowl trying to think of a more complementary description but as you had already put giant wooley mammoth poo into my head, that’s all I can see now! You are so funny!!!
    As for herbs, I’ve had lots of success with parsley, basil (in spring, summer and autumn), rosemary, sage and thyme but no luck ever with coriander ( it goes straight to seed for me).

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  4. Love the Poo!!
    As to herbs, if you want them to have more power, for most it’s best to have a soil that’s not too rich; more sandy than average, too. In rich soil, they will grow faster, bigger and have more leaves, but they will have less healing and flavouring power.

    In Victoria (BC), I used to walk by a favourite block. On the corner there is a small old home with a huge rosemary bush right next to the fence. It must be at least five feet tall, if not more. So unless you get -30 temps in the winter, yours should do well. Our Victoria gets little snow, and then only for a few days; sometimes a couple of weeks.

    Hope that helps a bit. ~ Linne

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  5. Oh thank you for the affirming words re the knitted wooly mammoth poo. I do believe I will start with rosemary. I love the flavor of roast veg with rosemary and fresh would be even nicer. It doesn’t snow here so they should thrive.

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  6. “that is exactly what an enormous knitted wooly mammoth’s poo would like!”

    The funniest thing I have read in days! It made me laugh like a loon sat here, even the cat looked at me in a weird way..bwahahahaha :))))))

    Sage/thyme and rosemary are easy to grow and very hardy plants. They survive here in my garden right through the year, even when it is -13 outside and they are snowed under sometimes for a week or more, come spring and they miraculously grow again from what resembles mere dried up stalks.

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